“The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia” An HBO Documentary by Director James Redford
April 11, 2013 at 7 p.m. in  Jackson Auditorium
Panel discussion to follow screening
This event is free and open to the public
About the documentary
The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia provides personal and uplifting accounts of the dyslexic experience from children, experts and iconic leaders, such as Sir Richard Branson and financier Charles Schwab. Directed by James Redford, the film not only clears up the misconceptions about the condition, but also paints a picture of hope for all who struggle with it.
 
Shining a spotlight on the latest scientific and psychological research, the film also highlights the work of Drs. Sally and Bennett Shaywitz, co-founders and co-directors of the Yale Center of Dyslexia and Creativity to illuminate the hidden origins and implications of dyslexia. Proving that dyslexia is a neurological issue and not a character flaw, The Big Picture beautifully illustrates that while the condition is an obstacle, it also carries some unique advantages, and ultimately can be overcome.
- From thebigpicturemovie.com

Panelists
Terry Weers

Mary Carol Coffman

Jon Cradit

Alex Norden
Myths & Facts
Q. 
-Myth-
Dyslexia is a visual problem; Dyslexic children and adults see and write letters and words backwards. If a child does not reverse b’s and d’s or p’s and q’s, he or she cannot be dyslexic.
A. 
-Fact-
Dyslexia is fundamentally a problem in spoken language; it is not a visual problem, Many children reverse their letters when learning to write, regardless of whether or not they are dyslexic.

Q. 
-Myth-
Smart people can’t be dyslexic; if you are dyslexic, you can’t be very smart. 
A. 
-Fact-
Some of the very brightest boys and girls struggle to read. Dyslexia occurs in people of all levels of intelligence. Many gifted people at the top of their fields are dyslexic. 

Q. 
-Myth-
People who are dyslexic are unable to read.
A. 
-Fact-
Most commonly, dyslexic children and adults do learn to read; the problem is the effort they must exert in order to read. Other people, no smarter or more capable, become “fluent” readers early on, so that reading is automatic, fast, and pleasurable. In the contrast, dyslexic children remain “manual” readers who read slowly and with great effort.

Q. 
-Myth-
If you perform well in school, you can’t be dyslexic.
A. 
-Fact-
Some people with dyslexia perform very well in school; these students are highly motivated and work incredibly hard; many have received the necessary accommodation – such as receiving extra time to complete standardized tests – that allowed them to demonstrate their knowledge. Dyslexic students have completed rigorous programs at highly selective colleges, graduate and professional schools.
Famous People with Dyslexia
Orlando Bloom
Orlando Bloom, who was diagnosed with dyslexia at age seven, struggled with writing and reading throughout high school but was constantly encouraged by his mother to succeed.

Sir Richard Branson
Sir Richard Branson saw high school as a “nightmare” and would later drop out of school but then went on to start his own business and is now a millionaire. 

Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise, identified as dyslexic at the age of seven, could barely read even as he started his career in acting.

Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg struggled throughout high school but was never recognized as dyslexic until she was an adult. 

Jay Leno
Jay Leno even though he struggled in high school and was even told to just drop out, went on to graduate from high school and then earned a bachelor’s in speech therapy.